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ABF E-Buzz: July 2015
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ABF E-Buzz — July 2015


In This Issue:


Welcome to ABF E-Buzz

by Tim Tucker, ABF President

"Hot July brings cooling showers,

Apricots and gillyflowers." 

- Sara Coleridge, Pretty Lessons in Verse

 

Welcome back!

Hope you are keeping cool and keeping your bees cool as well. It's really been hot here in Kansas, and throughout much of the Midwest temperatures are making things difficult for the bees. Make sure that you have some level of shade available this time of year. Sometimes it’s just setting a board or pallet up against the west side of your hives. It's also very necessary for the bees to have a close water source. The closer the better. Bees will use a lot of water cooling the hive on hot days and that means that they can get behind in their water needs if the source is too far away. So, if you don't have a pond or creek with available water, you should provide it for your bees. There's lots of ways to do that but the simplest is to use five gallon buckets with screen wire immersed in them. This gives you a good supply that doesn't need refreshed too often, perhaps daily, but one that will not drown a lot of bees either. The screen will give them a chance to crawl out of the water if they fall into it where they may not be able to grasp the side of the pail if their feet are wet. So keep those bees cool!

Recently at a Farmer's Market a couple walked up to the table and commented that they were practicing vegans and did not use honey because it was an animal product. They did however consume pollen for its health benefits. I told them that in the most rigid of terms they may be correct, but I explained to them that honey is not a product that is made from or produced by the bee’s body. It is only nectar that is collected by the bees.

They had no idea that bees have a honey stomach for the purpose of holding nectar until they can return to the hive, where a house bee removes it with her proboscis and places it in the cells of the honey comb. There it is reduced in moisture content by the bees to the magic level of 18.6% water or less; this is when it becomes honey. So it's not like cows, who consume hay and grain and actually produce milk. It's also not like chickens who eat a diet of protein and carbohydrates and produce eggs and meat. It's not comparable to silkworms that actually produce the silk as they make their cocoons. Yes, honeybees produce honey from nectar, but it isn't a bodily function of the bees. They also don't have to be sacrificed, in any significant number or as an organism, to utilize the product. In other words, the super organism of the hive does not have to be destroyed to consume the product. Yes, we may kill a few bees when harvesting the honey but most beekeepers keep this at a minimum and it's not significant in any respect to the survival of the colony.

I also explained to them that we always try to leave enough honey for the bees to survive the winter, which in our area is approximately 60 lbs.; we don't harvest every drop of honey we can and then feed the bees a substitute. Very few beekeepers depopulate their hives at harvest time and replace them in the spring with packages, as it's just become too costly to use this process. Most beekeepers today are struggling to keep their colony numbers up and strong enough to survive the winter. There are also those that practice environmental veganism, considering whether the food is from a source that is sustainable. Most beekeepers utilize management practices that are sustainable.

We may not always see the results today that we did twenty years ago, but we are maintaining the bees in numbers that are staying level. That accomplishment has allowed us to continue pollinating our commercial crops here in the U.S. and around the world. There are not enough native bees and pollinators to do the job. I still haven't seen a bumble bee this year! The couple walked away with a bottle of honey and one of pollen as well. I don't know if they will use it or if I fully convinced them, but I at least gave them something to think about and they were better informed than they were when they arrived at our booth that morning. So, what do you think? Is honey a product vegans can and should use?

We just passed another milestone in our Facebook community here at ABF. Within a two-week period, we increased our likes by over 250 to reach a milestone of 8,000. Today we have over 8,300 likes, with a goal of surpassing 10,000 by the end of the year. We hope that you all use this valuable resource, and if you have information that you think is pertinent to the beekeeping industry, send it to me or ABF Executive Director Regina K. Robuck, and we will see that it is posted properly. There is so much going on today and our Facebook page gives you an opportunity to stay up to date on all of the latest news. We try hard to make information available on a timely basis and keep the public informed with things we believe to be truthful and pertinent. So use this and visit us daily at the ABF Facebook page!

Well, it's another great issue of ABF E-Buzz with loads of information from our contributors. We have an update on our Honey Queen and Princess from Anna Kettlewell, Science Buzz by Dr. Marion Ellis and another Kids and Bees report from Sarah Red-Laird. There's also lots of great buzzmakers and another clue for our puzzle that no one solved last month. So, we hope you enjoy your time spent here and if there's something you would like to see in an upcoming ABF E-Buzz, just send me an emailWe'll be glad to add it to next month’s issue.


Bee a Giver

By this time you are well into your 2015 beekeeping year. The American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) is well into its year, too, and is focusing on the legislative goals that were set during the Anaheim conference. ABF President Tim Tucker, and ABF Vice President Gene Brandi are working hard to make sure ABF has their focus on the 2015 legislative priorities which include:

  • Funding for Research
  • Maintaining ARS Lab Funding
  • Protecting our Honey Market
  • Pesticides
  • Promoting and Protecting Honey Bee Habitats
  • Crop Insurance, ELAP, and H-2A Labor Programs
  • Transportation Issues

Click here to donate to the ABF Legislative Fund today! 


Bee Educated: ABF's 2015 Series "Conversation with a Beekeeper" Webinars Continue in July

This is an ABF member benefit. Please visit our ABF website for more information and to sign up.

Apimondia USA Bid - What, When Where and Why

Thursday, July 30, 2015

8:00 p.m. ET / 7:00 p.m. CT / 6:00 p.m. MT / 5:00 p.m. PT / 4:00 p.m. AKST / 3:00 p.m. HST

Debbie Seib, Chairman, Apimondia Bid for 2019 Inspection.

 

SESSION DETAILS: 

What is Apimondia and why would you like to see it come to the USA? The Apimondia International Apicultural Congress brings researchers, scientists and beekeepers together to learn and share what is transpiring in the world about our beloved honey bees. For the past three years, a team of researchers, scientists and beekeepers in the US have been putting together a intercontinental conference which includes; competitions, hands on workshops, round table discussions, outstanding tours and presentations by some of the best researchers in the world. What's in it for you? Join us on the webinar and find out.


Register Today and Join Us for Palm Trees & Healthy Bees in Sunny Florida!  

 

2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow, January 5-9, 2016

Join us for a buzzworthy experience at the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow, January 5-9, 2016. The conference will be held at the Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa, in Ponte Vedra Beach (Jacksonville), Florida. Begin your New Year with mild temperatures and hundreds of fellow beekeepers sharing experiences, best practices and research while making like-minded friends.

Features of the conference include:

  • General session full of presentations by industry experts
  • Robust tradeshow to learn about the latest product and services available to beekeepers to nurture and grow their business or interest
  • Track sessions on Thursday specific to various stages of beekeeping
  • Over 15 hands-on workshops
  • 2016 Honey Show
  • Optional social activity on Thursday
  • Shared Interest Group meetings
  • ABF annual banquet
  • Coronation of the 2016 American Honey Queen and Honey Princess
  • And much, much more . . .

Registration is Open:

Registration is now open for the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow. Register by October 14th to save $100 and secure your place at this all-important conference.

Conference Hotel:

The Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa is the host hotel for the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation Conference & Tradeshow. This hotel offers 65 acres of lush landscaping, a dazzling lagoon and sunshine galore and offers an array of amenities including:

  • Complimentary Internet in guest rooms
  • Complimentary self-parking
  • 100% non-smoking hotel
  • Private balconies overlooking lovely views
  • Fitness center and four pools
  • Pets allowed (with non-refundable deposit)
Guest Room Reservations Warning:

It has been brought to our attention that a Housing Company is contacting ABF members and advising that the conference hotel is almost sold out and that they need to make their reservations with them at that time. This is not accurate! No one should, or will be calling you to make your hotel reservations. All reservations can be made directly with the hotel via telephone or online reservation link. If you would like to secure your guest room for the conference, the room rate is $125.00 + tax.

Secure your guest room today for the conference at the negotiated rate of $125.00 per night, plus tax (currently 16%). This rate is available until Friday, December 11, 2015, or until the room block is sold out – whichever comes first. Don’t hesitate, make your reservations today!
 
This conference is sure to be an exciting and enriching experience that we can’t wait to share with you! Visit the conference website for more information, including schedule at a glance and hotel information. Please check back often as we continue to post new information. We look forward to celebrating Palm Trees & Healthy Bees with you!

EPA Pesticide Program Updates 

 

EPA’s Proposal to Protect Bees from Acutely Toxic Pesticides – Comment Period Extension

EPA is extending the comment period on its proposed plan to prohibit the use of all highly toxic pesticides when crops are in bloom and bees are present under contract for pollination services. Initially released on May 29, 2015, the plan also recommends that states and tribes develop pollinator protection plans and best management practices.

The 30-day extension ends on August 28 and will be announced in the Federal Register. Please visit the regulatory docket, EPA-HQ-OPP-2014-0818, to read the plan and submit comments.

Learn more about the proposal by viewing EPA’s recording of the June 24 webinar or by viewing the webinar slides: Webinar Slides for EPA's Proposal to Protect Bees from Acutely Toxic Pesticides (PDF). Learn more about EPA’s Actions to Protect Pollinators: http://www2.epa.gov/pollinator-protection/epa-actions-protect-pollinators.       


Kids and Bees: For the Little Book Larva (Rather than Worm)

by Sarah Red-Laird

 

I often times get emails from beekeepers who were asked to visit a classroom, and they have no idea where to start, what to talk about, and what to do with the kids. Well, I’ve got great news. I will be developing a curriculum this year with the help of the International Bee Research Association, The Foundation for the Preservation of Honey Bees, and The Xerces Society. Until then, I have a few tips to get you started.

  • Keep it simple, and just rely on your star power! Beekeepers are famous right now!! The kids are going to be so excited to meet you, and be full of so many questions. Just be yourself, express why you love bees and beekeeping, and share a few cool factoids that you know about bees to get the conversation started.
  • Bring an observation hive. There is really nothing more amazing to kids then getting up close and personal with hundreds of bees: the sounds, the smells, feeling the buzz of the hive and the warmth of the brood though the glass. They will remember this forever.
  • Read them a story! Kids pre-k through fifth grade really love stories. There are some great classics, as well as newer books that are accurate, poetic, and beautifully illustrated. Below are a few of my favorites.
Flight of the Honey Bee, by Raymond Huber
Follow the flight of a honey bee as she searches for nectar to sustain her hive and, along the way, pollinates flowers to produce seeds and fruits. A tiny honey bee emerges from the hive for the first time. Using sunlight, landmarks, and scents to remember the path, she goes in search of pollen and nectar to share with the thousands of other bees in her hive. She uses her powerful sense of smell to locate the flowers that sustain her, avoids birds that might eat her, and returns home to share her finds with her many sisters. Nature lovers and scientists-to-be are invited to explore the fascinating life of a honey bee. Back matter includes information about protecting bees and an index. $6.99, Amazon.com
 
Are You a Bee?, by Judy Allen, illustrations by Tudor Humphries
From the perspective of a honey bee, the backyard is a busy place. A young bee faces many challenges as it takes its place in the hive and joins in the work of the bee community. $6.25, Amazon.com
 
The Beeman, by Laurie Krebs (Note: Dr. Dewey Caron consulted on this book)
Told from the viewpoint of a child whose Grandpa is a beekeeper, this rhyming text offers an accessible and engaging introduction to the behavior of bees. You will learn where they live, how honey is made, what a beekeeper does, and more. Now in paperback! $8.99, Amazon.com
 
In the Trees, Honey Bees! By Lori Mortensen
Here is the ideal introduction for preschoolers and early elementary children to insects that are not only amazing but also critically important to humans. Inside-the-hive views of a wild colony of honey bees offer close-ups of the queen, the cells, even bee eggs. Simple verse will engage a young child, while sidebars with fascinating information satisfy the somewhat older child. Parents, teachers, and interested children will enjoy much more information about both wild and domestic hives in the back of the book. The detailed art shimmers with life, highlighting each hair or grain of pollen on the bees. A wild hive in a tree in her own backyard served as a model for the artist! $7.50, Amazon.com
 
Keep in touch for more news on the upcoming Kids and Bees curriculum, and mark your calendars for Kids and Bees programs in Boulder for the Western Apicultural Society Meeting on October 3rd, Redondo Beach for New York City Honey Week on September 12th, and Jacksonville, FL, for the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation Conference & Tradeshow, January 8th.  

Science Buzz: Forced Swarming

by Dr. Marion Ellis

 

The Science Buzz column traditionally reports current research. This month it will look at research that is 100 years old but still relevant, especially this year in my neck of the woods, the Great Plains. We have experienced frequent rainy days followed by sunny days followed by more rainy days followed by more sunny days, followed by more rainy days… throughout the months of April – June. Nectar flows that start and stop frequently due to rain are powerful stimuli for the swarming impulse.

In the early 1900’s bee journals were replete with articles about swarm prevention, and it was considered a primary obstacle to having a productive apiary. With all the concern about parasites, diseases, pesticides and nutrition, the age-old problem of swarm prevention has not received much attention, but when other concerns are effectively dealt with, it remains an important challenge to managing a productive apiary. Effective bee management builds colonies that are strong enough to swarm and then diverts their energy into storing honey. Invariably, well-managed apiaries will have some colonies preparing to swarm, and beekeepers need a plan for dealing them.

In the early 1900’s beekeeping had changed from keeping hives in skeps, hollow logs, etc. and using management methods that encouraged swarming to using Langstroth hives and management methods that discouraged swarming. Consequently, bee stocks used at the time had a history of being selected for swarming.

One of my favorite authors on the subject of swarming is Dr. C.C. Miller. In his book, Fifty Years Among the Bees, published in 1915 by the A.I. Root Company, he advocates forced swarming. When colonies were found preparing to swarm, Dr. Miller would move the hive a few feet, place a hive body of empty combs on the former hive location and shake all the bees out into the empty hive. He then would distribute the brood to other colonies to strengthen them. Alternately, he would exchange the position of the hive preparing to swarm with a nucleus colony, effectively exchanging field forces.

When done on a sunny day with a honey flow, fighting was not a problem. Both methods effectively deal with the swarming impulse by letting the colony swarm while the beekeeper is present. Many beekeepers deal with the swarming impulse by cutting out queen cells and providing more supers, an approach that frequently does not work when colonies have queen cells that are sealed or about to be sealed.

Successful beekeeping requires having colonies that are strong enough to swarm, but that do not swarm. Forced swarming and exchanging field forces between strong and weak colonies are two methods that are effective, require no follow up visit, and can be accomplished quickly. When conditions are right, even colonies started from package bees may swarm. Having young queens in all colonies, providing adequate room, moving brood to equalize populations, and splitting strong colonies in the spring often are adequate to prevent swarming, but when they are not, forced swarming can save the day.

A thorough understanding of swarm biology and management is critical to successfully managing bees for honey production, and some of the best literature on the subject is over 100 years old, when swarming was the biggest challenge beekeepers faced… those were the days!


Bee Updated: Latest and Greatest News from the National Honey Board 

 

National Honey Board Hosts Innovative Bakers at 2015 Honey Baking Summit

The National Honey Board (NHB) kicked off June with their annual Honey Baking Summit. This exclusive event gathers a small group of the most innovative bakers in the business for an immersive, multi-day event, all about honey.

This invite-only event aims to teach industry-leading bakers how to bake with honey, replace existing sweeteners with honey and market products to a growing consumer segment that craves natural, clean label foods. Participants were treated to honey tastings and got their hands dirty networking, brainstorming and working with other top bakers to formulate new products with honey.

The exclusivity of the Honey Baking Summit event draws the attendance of the top leaders in the baking trade and this year’s Summit was no exception. This year’s guests included:

  • Four James Beard nominees:
    • Jim Lahey, first recipient of the James Beard Award for Outstanding Baker (2015)
    • Alex Bois, finalist for James Beard Rising Star Chef (2015)
    • William Leaman, semi-finalist for Outstanding Pastry Chef for the 2013 James Beard Awards (Leaman was also named one of the Top 10 Next Generation Chocolatiers in the United States in 2004 and served as the captain of the 2005 Bread Bakers Guild Team USA, leading the team to victory at the Coupe du Monde de Boulangerie)
    • Kelsey McCreight Williamson, creator of James Beard nominated artisan bread
  • Third-generation, European-trained Master Baker, holder of the United States patent for the design of a Soft Pretzel Stick, and 2011 America’s Best Raisin Bread Contest artisan grand prize winner, Gary Gottenbusch, and Madagascar beekeeper turned baker, Jeremy Gulley (learned beekeeping while serving in the Peace Corps)

This year’s event kicked off with an opening reception on Monday, June 8th, giving participants their first opportunity to meet members of the NHB, as well as network with fellow bakers before diving into the intensive two-day Summit.

The first full day of the Honey Summit consisted of educational sessions on the story of honey, the science of baking with honey, and what consumers are looking for. Attendees participated in honey varietal tastings, and were even treated to a tour at the local Fruithill Apiaries, where they had opportunity to don the iconic bee suits and see the ladies in action!

This educational day also featured hands-on demonstrations, during which attendees had the chance get their hands dirty modifying honey baking formulas, pairing the various honey varietals with different types of breads and making adjustments to the percentages of honey used in recipes to see the resulting taste, moistness, mouthfeel and crumb of the bread.

On the final morning of the Summit, the group toured the local Seven Stars Bakery and tasted the different breads and baked goods that were created the day before. Following the tasting panel, we closed out this year’s Summit with a discussion on what consumers think about honey, and in a time when consumers are looking for more natural, clean label foods, honey’s wholesome image makes it a great ingredient for bakers to have in their arsenal.

This year’s Summit was another great success, and now that we have armed these innovative industry leaders with our message about the benefits of honey, we can’t wait to see what they come up with!


Honey Queen Buzz 

by Anna Kettlewell, American Honey Queen Program Chair



Queen Gabrielle learns how to keep bees in the desert.

As July heats up, so do the Queen and Princess’s travel schedules! Late July brought the start of seemingly nonstop travel for our representatives this year!

Queen Gabrielle headed to Arizona for a week in mid-July to promote alongside of ABF board member and former American Honey Queen, Emily Brown. The two were active in media and show promotions for Emily’s AZ Queen Bee business. They spent several days teaching the public about the importance of honey bees and answered many questions about the prevalence of Africanized honeybees and how the public can benefit from their good qualities and protect themselves from their adverse qualities. It was a good opportunity to teach consumers that honey is produced in all 50 states – including the hottest and coldest climates!

Late July started our fair and festival season, and Queen Gabrielle and Princess Hayden made stops at the Warren County Farmers’ Fair (New Jersey), the Minneapolis Pollinator Party, the Ohio State Fair, and the New Jersey State Fair. Fairs are always a fantastic opportunity for promoting our industry, and these three fairs have provided an abundance of opportunities for the Queens and the organizations sponsoring their visits. 



Princess Hayden reads to preschoolers about honey bees

Queen Gabrielle and Princess Hayden were involved in media interviews, cooking demonstrations, stage presentations, and hive demonstrations. They can always provide a great extra set of hands and a fantastic presence for your exhibit, to which these states can attest!

A new promotion for us this year came from an inquiry from an event planner at the Henry Ford in Michigan. After seeing an article about the American Honey Queen Program last year in Modern Farmer, the event planner contacted the program to secure the Queen to be a guest speaker at their Maker Faire, one of the three largest of its kind in the country, in late July. Queen Gabrielle made a special appearance at this event, speaking about the importance of honey bees and the fascinating world in which they live. She also, along with Henry Ford volunteers, helped thousands of children create seed bombs, promoting the importance of reestablishing honey bee habitat wherever we can. Special thanks are owed to Browning’s Honey Company and Badger State Apiaries for their assistance in providing the supplies for this event.

Please stay tuned to the American Honey Queen Program Facebook page (and, if you haven’t, please like the page to see what our representatives are doing for you each day!) for more details on the Queen and Princess’s busy travels over the next few months! Happy promoting!


Bee Thinking

No one got the answer to last month's riddle, so here's another clue for you. Think you know the answer? The first to e-mail Valerie Lake at valerielake@abfnet.org will lay claim to another fun ABF prize.

Yell at me, talk to me, I don't care.

I'll still go with you 'bout anywhere.

I can get you to Bangor, Maine,

Charlotte, Buffalo, Cleveland or maybe even Spain.

There's absolutely nothing I can't do,

I'll even sing a song, or take you to the zoo.

I can help you with your math, figure answers quick.

I will help with making dinner. Fix you if you're sick.


Buzzmakers: Latest and Greatest Beekeeping Industry News

  • Burt’s Bees cofounder Burt Shavitz dies at age 80 – here’s his amazing success story. Learn More.
  • While the primary concern for most involved is the health and vitality of honey bee populations, many are also interested in the impact honey bees have on crops they have not traditionally been used to pollinate, such as soybeans. Read more.
  • Asian honey bee queen escapes in the Northern Territory, swarm destroyed in Darwin. Learn more.
  • When you picture a beekeeper, you might not think of a 20-year-old living in the heart of the country’s busiest city, but the University of Toronto’s Beekeeping Education Enthusiast Society is busting the beekeeping stereotype. Read more.
  • Following engagement with investors and advocates, General Mills has become the first major packaged foods company to improve policies to protect bees and other pollinators from the impacts of pesticides. Read more.
  • As the White House moves forward with implementing its National Pollinator Strategy, Center for Food Safety and our allies will continue pressuring the administration to take stronger action by curbing the use of bee-toxic pesticides (and you can, too), but in the meantime, what else can we do to help pollinators? Learn more.


ABF Welcomes New Members — June 2015

  • Kimberly Kester, Wisconsin 
  • Richard Nettles, South Carolina
  • Jennifer Holmes, Florida
  • Harry Morse, Texas
  • Donald Cummins, Utah
  • Chris Muncy, Texas
  • Christine Miller, New Jersey

 

  • Joleen Kinsel, Ohio
  • David Briggs, Massachusetts
  • Lianne Caruso, Maryland
  • Holly Harrison, Georgia
  • Kim Robertson, Florida
  • Melanie Kirby, New Mexico


 


Recipe of the Month: Fruity Greek Yogurt Popsicles  

Source: National Honey Board

Ingredients:

1 cup pitted cherries or 1/2 cup strawberries (or other fruit of your choice)

1 cup Greek non fat yogurt

2 tablespoons HONEY

Directions:

In a small food processor or blender, puree the fruit for 30 seconds to 1 minute. (Do not blend for too long or the puree will become too watery). In a measuring cup or bowl with pouring spout, stir together the yogurt and honey. Fold in about 2 tablespoons of the fruit puree. Taste and add more honey or fruit puree as desired. Pour fruit and yogurt mixture into popsicle molds, filling about ¾ of the way. Add wooden sticks and freeze for at least 3 hours.

To remove: run warm water over the bottle of the popsicle mold and gently twist and pull out the popsicles.


Science Buzz 

by Stephen Cutts and Dave Westervelt

With the feral population of honey bees in the southwestern states and Florida growing more and more Africanized, and the increasing number of “Backyard Beekeepers” wanting to manage European colonies, there is a need for African Honey Bee (AHB) education and preparedness. Education and preparedness are the key to proper response to potential stinging incidents, whether these incidents involve honey bees or other native pollinators easily found in Florida. There is also the increasing potential for vehicular accidents involving trucks or a semi loaded with honey bee colonies. For over a decade Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and UF/IFAS have been striving to educate consumers about AHB and the importance of training First Responders.

May 8, 2015: Judy Ludlow, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, UF/IFAS Extension Calhoun County, the County’s ESF17 Coordinator, has arranged for First Responder Training in the panhandle to be held at UF/IFAS Extension Washington County at 1424 Jackson Avenue, Chipley, FL 32428. University of Florida IFAS Extension Beekeeping Specialist Dr. William (Bill) Kern, who has trained first responders throughout the southeast, will be teaching: Africanized Honeybee Biology and Behavior; Threat Triage, Personal Protective Equipment; Rescue Tactics, and Situation Outcomes; Field Demonstrations Using PPE and Foam-Equipped Engines.

This Event is Free, but Please Call to Register:

UF/IFAS Extension Calhoun County - 850-674-8323, or

UF/IFAS Extension Washington County - 850-638-6180


Register Today and Join Us for Palm Trees & Healthy Bees in Sunny Florida!  

 

2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow, January 5-9, 2016

Join us for a buzzworthy experience at the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow, January 5-9, 2016. The conference will be held at the Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa, in Ponte Vedra Beach (Jacksonville), Florida. Begin your New Year with mild temperatures and hundreds of fellow beekeepers sharing experiences, best practices and research while making like-minded friends.

Features of the conference include:

  • General session full of presentations by industry experts
  • Robust tradeshow to learn about the latest product and services available to beekeepers to nurture and grow their business or interest
  • Track sessions on Thursday specific to various stages of beekeeping
  • Over 15 hands-on workshops
  • 2016 Honey Show
  • Optional social activity on Thursday
  • Shared Interest Group meetings
  • ABF annual banquet
  • Coronation of the 2016 American Honey Queen and Honey Princess
  • And much, much more . . .

Registration is Open:

Registration is now open for the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Conference & Tradeshow. Register by October 14th to save $100 and secure your place at this all-important conference.

Conference Hotel:

The Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa is the host hotel for the 2016 American Beekeeping Federation Conference & Tradeshow. This hotel offers 65 acres of lush landscaping, a dazzling lagoon and sunshine galore and offers an array of amenities including:

  • Complimentary Internet in guest rooms
  • Complimentary self-parking
  • 100% non-smoking hotel
  • Private balconies overlooking lovely views
  • Fitness center and four pools
  • Pets allowed (with non-refundable deposit)
Guest Room Reservations Warning:

It has been brought to our attention that a Housing Company is contacting ABF members and advising that the conference hotel is almost sold out and that they need to make their reservations with them at that time. This is not accurate! No one should, or will be calling you to make your hotel reservations. All reservations can be made directly with the hotel via telephone or online reservation link. If you would like to secure your guest room for the conference, the room rate is $125.00 + tax.

Secure your guest room today for the conference at the negotiated rate of $125.00 per night, plus tax (currently 16%). This rate is available until Friday, December 11, 2015, or until the room block is sold out – whichever comes first. Don’t hesitate, make your reservations today!
 
This conference is sure to be an exciting and enriching experience that we can’t wait to share with you! Visit the conference website for more information, including schedule at a glance and hotel information. Please check back often as we continue to post new information. We look forward to celebrating Palm Trees & Healthy Bees with you!
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