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ABF E-Buzz: June 2011
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ABF E-Buzz — June 2011

In This Issue:


Welcome Back to E-Buzz

by Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

God gave us June and all her lovely flowers
Bright sunny days and pleasant evening hours
Shady green glens and serene sunlit dells
And leafy bowers adorned with blue bluebells.

— Francis Duggan

Welcome back to ABF E-Buzz! June's normal nectar flow was here as expected, but it ended after a three-week issuance of limited measure, which could not be described in any exciting or positive terms. The bees bulked up in the brood chambers and are in much better shape, but there is little in the honey supers to extract from our spring flow. It ended here the last few days as the bees are back at the doors of the honey house with a vengeance or any bit of spilled honey that they can find. It is always amazing how you can put out some buckets or barrels for them to clean and if there is a nectar flow on they seem very slow to find them. They seem actually to prefer the collection of nectar and the work that it involves in reducing and curing from the natural state. We will have to hope for a good fall flow and the summer rains to start the bloom and hope that we can have them in shape for the task.

In this issue we have the results of the first ABF E-Buzz photo contest...we had some really great entries! You can view them all at http://www.abfnet.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=145. I would like to thank all of those who sent photos in and took the time to "bee" involved. For those who didn't win, we hope that you try again in the next contest that we will be running through the end of the year. So, you have a good five months or more to come up with your winning entries.
   
We also have another great article from Peter Teal that I am sure you will find informative and helpful to your beekeeping experience. Thanks, Peter, for sharing your vast information on varroa with us in the field.    

Our beekeeper of the month is Randy Fair, who has an interesting story about his life with the bees. I know you will find him to be another individual you want to look forward to meeting at one of our annual ABF conferences, like the one coming up in January of 2012 in Las Vegas.
    
Also, Bonnie Woodworth sent me an e-mail from Jeffrey Main with USDA. He compiles the monthly Honey Report that they send out and has requested that anyone who might be willing to help with local information on the condition of colonies, honey prices or just industry information can contact him at the USDA at  jeffmain@amsusda.gov or 509.575.8903. You can also find the June report at http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf. The June report indicates that honey prices remain strong in the $1.60 to $1.75 price range and will likely remain in this strong position due to unfavorable weather across the U.S. this year.  

We have another great honey recipe for you to try out and add to your recipe box. You can fix this wonderful apple crisp and add the honey ice cream to it that you've been making since last month. There's also an article about the new Highways BEE Act, which was introduced this past week in the U.S. House of Representatives. Also, there's several new Buzzmakers that will keep you informed on what's happening across the country in regard to honey bees, honey and bee-related news.

We hope that you find this newsletter a valuable tool in your information index and that you will provide us with anything that you would like to see in upcoming issues by dropping me an e-mail at tuckerb@hit.net. Again, thanks for stopping by and let's all keep on buzzin'!


Science Buzz

by Peter Teal, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, USDA-ARS

Peter Teal

Inside the Mind and Body of a Mite

Beyond being a scourge of European honey bees, Varroa mites have their own life cycle and have to make the correct choices to thrive. They must find appropriate hosts, move to the best honey bee, invade new colonies and, most of all, reproduce. They have a complex life cycle, moving between bee adults and larvae and having preferences for specific stages within adults. Mites spend 1/3 of their lives on adult bees, but then enter brood cells before capping and are capped along with the brood where they lay eggs, first a male and then females. The new mites feed on the bee pupa, mate with their siblings and then the females emerge as adults with the baby bee. This means all the mites you see in the hive are females. The newly emerged mites transfer to young bees in the hive before re-entering cells for another reproductive bout. About 2/3 of the mites in the hive are in cells at any one time, so if the average capped period is 13 days, the phoretic (riding on an adult bee) period should last about a week. Control methods, including pesticides, powdered sugar or a trap drone frame, all target adult mites that are phoretic on adult bees or are making the transfer to the larval host. Thus a single sugar shake only removes about 1/3 of the mites in a colony.

So what do these mites want? What are they attracted to? It depends on what stage they are in, but some things are always true. Mites only respond to attractive cues when they get very close to the odor, about 5mm, the distance from a bee to a larva. Mites like nurse bees better than newly emerged baby bees, pollen foragers or newly emerged drones. In the lab, mites are arrested or possibly attracted to waxy hydrocarbons, these could come from wax, adult bees or bee larvae. Many studies have shown mites respond to these chemicals, but none have used them to effectively attract or repel Varroa mites in hives. Mites are naturally repelled from invading queen cells and this likely stems from repellent chemicals in royal jelly, such as octanoic acid.

The chemical responses that lead mites into cells are stimuli that only act on mites at specific times in their life cycle. If a mite invaded an appropriate cell as soon as it was presented, we would expect the relative number of mites in cells at any time to be higher. As it is, mites spend a third of their lives on adult bees and we have not found any mites that will choose larvae over adult bees when presented with a choice in the lab. This means that either the larvae, when disturbed for assays, cease to be attractive or mites make pretty shrewd decisions. If a cell is uncapped and the larva removed, it makes much more sense to get on the nearest bee than stay on the larva as it is removed from the hive. So, except for that brief time when a mite is looking to move into a cell, a bee is always the right choice if a mite is exposed to it. Also, the preference for hive bees is adaptive for many mites, but the number of mites on foragers, drones and other bees that might drift between colonies has enabled mites to spread rapidly and infest new colonies rapidly.

Why do we care about these chemical cues when we could treat mites with some targeted new pesticide you may ask? This is because mites and other insects can develop resistance to pesticides. By hijacking a chemical mites use to find hosts, and instead attracting them to a trap or disrupting host finding, it would be more difficult for them to develop resistance. Also, this bee or hive-related cue comes from the bees and so would not harm them. For now the search continues for these chemical cues that mites use to locate hosts.

Resources:

  • Kuenen L, Calderone N. 1997. Transfers of Varroa mites from newly emerged bees: Preferences for age- and function-specific adult bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Journal of Insect Behavior 10: 213-228.
  • Piccolo FD, Nazzi F, Vedova GD, Milani N. 2010. Selection of Apis mellifera workers by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor using host cuticular hydrocarbons. Parasitology First View: 1-7.
  • Rickli M, Diehl PA, Guerin PM. 1994. Cuticle alkanes of honey bee larvae mediate arrestment of bee parasite Varroa jacobsoni. Journal of Chemical Ecology 20: 2437-2453.

Contact Adrian.Duehl@ars.usda.gov for more information.


Beekeeper of the Month: Randy Fair

by Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

Our featured beekeeper of the month is a man that has been involved with bees for a good deal of his life because his father had an interest in bees. Randy Fair, of Mansfield, Louisiana, initially hated working with bees. As a young man, his father, of course, would have him help with harvesting honey and general work when his dad was operating around 50 colonies. Unfortunately, his dad didn't have extra gloves and veils, and it was always a painful experience when it came time to work with the bees. So, when Randy left home, his interest in bees was zero and he was glad to not have to take a "stinging" each year at harvest time.

Randy Fair

Randy began a career with International Paper at the Mansfield Mill, which is a producer of liner board and corrugated medium, items that are used to produce cardboard. When the trees came into the mill some would have bees in them. The noise and vibrations of the paper mill also were attracting feral colony swarms. In 2004, he captured four swarms at the mill and that's when he started his own apiary with those first bees of his own. They were, according to his wife, his new mistresses. Yes, Randy says he became obsessed with the bees and it started a new line of interest and learning. While still working with International Paper on his way to a conference, Randy's dad gave him a copy of a book titled The ABC and XYZ of Beekeeping and he read it cover to cover. He soon read ideas for management and manipulation of bee colonies, which raised questions about why his dad had done things the way he had always done them he would ask him, "Why do you always do this in this way when it says in ABC that you should do it this way?" After several of the questioning sessions, his dad responded that he was tired of hearing about that book. Randy responded with, "Then you shouldn't have given me the book!"

Randy soon learned that there are lots of ways to keep bees and he was in search of finding his own ways. By the time he retired in 2008, he was running about 90  colonies in his spare time. It was soon to become a full-time interest and today he runs over 200 colonies. His wife now states that she has the only husband with "5 million mistresses."

In the past, Randy collected swarms and even did extracting of bees from buildings, but soon discovered that there are easier ways to increase your numbers of colonies. Randy now enjoys delivering honey to local stores and managing his bees for optimum honey production. There is also a chance to pollinate a local blueberry farm, which has about 50 acres of berries, including blackberries and strawberries. He takes about 100 hives there to help the grower get the best from his berries. He completed a pollination contract with Hillcrest Blueberry Farm with good success, but Mother Nature had other plans. Soon after he moved his bees back to their spring yards, a tornado came through the Gloster/Frierson area and wiped out the blueberry, strawberry and blackberry crop. There were 100 mph straight-line winds and one-inch hail, as well. The Kingston Peach Orchard that he also provides pollination services for was also hit with a total loss of its peach crop. The weather has not been helpful and with 15 inches less rain than average there was no spring flow from white clover. His first pull of the year ended up with only four barrels, as opposed to nine barrels last year, so he is busy working to make splits and increases as he can.

He also cares for four hives located at the R.W. Norton Art Gallery and gives two demonstrations there during the year where visitors can see the bees working. His friend, Billy Hummer, of Hummer and Son Honey, brings an extractor and they actually process the honey from the hives, such that the public can understand where honey comes from and how we get it from the bees. Besides being active in the ABF, Randy is president of the Arklatex Beekeepers Association and vice president of the Louisiana State Beekeepers Association. He also serves on the Farm Bureau Board from Desoto Parish, so he keeps busy in his retirement.

Randy named his honey company Clear Lake Apiary because his house is located on the banks of Clear Lake in Desoto Parish. His house was used in the HBO series True Blood, which is a show about vampires. A while back they were looking for a house in a rural location that had lots of mossy trees and the producer, Alan Ball, found the Fair house just the item they needed for the show. Randy said it was a real education to see how many times they may shoot the same scene, which ends up being about 20 or 30 seconds in the show. Randy has also been the technical advisor for the A&E channel's "Billy the Exterminator" show where he has helped with bee relocation.

Randy is locally famous for his honey and for taking first place with his honey at the Louisiana State Fair in 2008, 2009 and 2010. He proudly displays a picture of this on his Web site at www.beebumbler.com.  He contributes the inspiration for the name of his Web site as a result of his daughters inquiring about bumble bees. His two daughters are grown and now live away from home. Rhonda, the oldest, lives in Norman, Oklahoma. Jennifer lives in Luling, Louisiana, outside of New Orleans. When the girls would talk to their mother on the phone and ask what dad was doing, the reply was "playing with his bees."

"The girls would ask how my bumble bees were doing and I would correct them that I had honey bees, not bumble bees," notes Randy. "Jennifer started picking at me more about my bumble bees. She came up with the phrase that her dad was 'bumbling with the bees' and thus the 'Bee Bumbler' was born."Randy began a career with International Paper at the Mansfield Mill, which is a producer of liner board and corrugated medium, items that are used to produce cardboard. When the trees came into the mill some would have bees in them. The noise and vibrations of the paper mill also were attracting feral colony swarms. In 2004, he captured four swarms at the mill and that's when he started his own apiary with those first bees of his own. They were, according to his wife, his new mistresses. Yes, Randy says he became obsessed with the bees and it started a new line of interest and learning. While still working with International Paper on his way to a conference, Randy's dad gave him a copy of a book titled The ABC and XYZ of Beekeeping and he read it cover to cover. He soon read ideas for management and manipulation of bee colonies, which raised questions about why his dad had done things the way he had always done them he would ask him, "Why do you always do this in this way when it says in ABC that you should do it this way?" After several of the questioning sessions, his dad responded that he was tired of hearing about that book. Randy responded with, "Then you shouldn't have given me the book!"

Randy soon learned that there are lots of ways to keep bees and he was in search of finding his own ways. By the time he retired in 2008, he was running about 90  colonies in his spare time. It was soon to become a full-time interest and today he runs over 200 colonies. His wife now states that she has the only husband with "5 million mistresses."

In the past, Randy collected swarms and even did extracting of bees from buildings, but soon discovered that there are easier ways to increase your numbers of colonies. Randy now enjoys delivering honey to local stores and managing his bees for optimum honey production. There is also a chance to pollinate a local blueberry farm, which has about 50 acres of berries, including blackberries and strawberries. He takes about 100 hives there to help the grower get the best from his berries. He completed a pollination contract with Hillcrest Blueberry Farm with good success, but Mother Nature had other plans. Soon after he moved his bees back to their spring yards, a tornado came through the Gloster/Frierson area and wiped out the blueberry, strawberry and blackberry crop. There were 100 mph straight-line winds and one-inch hail, as well. The Kingston Peach Orchard that he also provides pollination services for was also hit with a total loss of its peach crop. The weather has not been helpful and with 15 inches less rain than average there was no spring flow from white clover. His first pull of the year ended up with only four barrels, as opposed to nine barrels last year, so he is busy working to make splits and increases as he can.

He also cares for four hives located at the R.W. Norton Art Gallery and gives two demonstrations there during the year where visitors can see the bees working. His friend, Billy Hummer, of Hummer and Son Honey, brings an extractor and they actually process the honey from the hives, such that the public can understand where honey comes from and how we get it from the bees. Besides being active in the ABF, Randy is president of the Arklatex Beekeepers Association and vice president of the Louisiana State Beekeepers Association. He also serves on the Farm Bureau Board from Desoto Parish, so he keeps busy in his retirement.

Randy named his honey company Clear Lake Apiary because his house is located on the banks of Clear Lake in Desoto Parish. His house was used in the HBO series True Blood, which is a show about vampires. A while back they were looking for a house in a rural location that had lots of mossy trees and the producer, Alan Ball, found the Fair house just the item they needed for the show. Randy said it was a real education to see how many times they may shoot the same scene, which ends up being about 20 or 30 seconds in the show. Randy has also been the technical advisor for the A&E channel's "Billy the Exterminator" show where he has helped with bee relocation.

Randy is locally famous for his honey and for taking first place with his honey at the Louisiana State Fair in 2008, 2009 and 2010. He proudly displays a picture of this on his Web site at www.beebumbler.com.  He contributes the inspiration for the name of his Web site as a result of his daughters inquiring about bumble bees. His two daughters are grown and now live away from home. Rhonda, the oldest, lives in Norman, Oklahoma. Jennifer lives in Luling, Louisiana, outside of New Orleans. When the girls would talk to their mother on the phone and ask what dad was doing, the reply was "playing with his bees."

"The girls would ask how my bumble bees were doing and I would correct them that I had honey bees, not bumble bees," notes Randy. "Jennifer started picking at me more about my bumble bees. She came up with the phrase that her dad was 'bumbling with the bees' and thus the 'Bee Bumbler' was born."


Bee Informed: Book Review of 50 Years Among the Bees by Dr. C.C. Miller

by Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

There's no question that Dr. C.C. Miller is one of the most highly regarded authors when discussion revolves around bees and the beginnings of modern beekeeping. He undoubtedly penned some of the most accurate, articulate and interesting notes on bees and the human condition, as well. His book, 50 Years Among the Bees, will be the focus of many upcoming book reviews, as it would be impossible to fairly address it in a single article.

It is important to remember that at the time Dr. Miller was accumulating his thoughts on bees, there was not a commercial beekeeping industry as compared to today's endeavors of modern apiculture. While advances were coming quickly and inventions of the day were laying the groundwork of modern beekeeping and its eventual bloom, the industry was still in its infancy.

The introduction to the book is a synopsis of the personality of Dr. Miller, written by E.R. Root, who was his long-time friend and personal confidant and whose father, A.I. Root, had maintained a lifelong relationship with Dr. Miller. This "Tribute to Dr. Miller" was published in October 1920, at his passing. The Gleanings in Bee Culture gives a wonderful description of the character, life and wit of a man that I am sure most of us today would give much to share a few golden moments with.

Of course, you can spend many hours with him in pondering and reflecting upon his writings. Mr. Root had convinced Dr. Miller to reproduce many of his remarks and thoughts made at conventions in articles and alluded to them as "those little sidelines that are so helpful and seem like a drink of cold water on a hot day." His contributions to the Gleanings were titled "Stray Straw" and Mr. Root notes that "his paragraphs of five to a dozen lines were worth whole articles." Root reflects on a man who knew no criticism or difficulty that always looked for the positive aspects of any ill fortune. Having lost much of his savings through the mismanagement of others he wrote: "I have not lost all. I have my good wife and my sister. I have a few years of vigorous life left to me yet. I have in prospect a good crop of honey."

There are many of us who might spend time studying just the richness of life this man of yesteryear possessed and emulate his way of living life to its fullest. Root explains that he not only carried optimism throughout the day, he went beyond that. "His conversation was one ripple of merriment throughout." Root also goes into the aspect of beekeeping that seems to never change and that is the ability of beekeepers to endlessly find points of contention to disagree upon amongst themselves and dissolve relationships, impaling their education and experience on the spike of self-importance.

While attending a National Beekeepers Association meeting, there apparently was a bitter fight in regards to who knows what, but nevertheless Dr. Miller and Professor Cook were noted by Root to be "without peer." Dr. Miller addressed the group with his smile that was more persuasive than a policeman's club, saying, "You have asked me to pour oil on the troubled waters. The job is too big for me, boys. But, I will try my best if you will offer a prayer that only good may prevail." And it did.

Dr. E.F. Phillips who was also a close friend to Dr. Miller and writes in the introduction that "to discuss in detail the investigations that Dr. Miller carried on in beekeeping would virtually be to write a history of beekeeping of the past half century, for there have been no important discoveries or events of that period in which he did not play some part." Dr. Phillips makes note that his largest contribution to the industry came late in his life and was related to an outbreak of European Foulbrood, which became rampant in Dr. Miller's apiaries in 1909. His careful observations and methodologies provided the basis for effective control of this disease. He states that the characteristic that set Dr. Miller apart from all others was his "keen interest in things, as he expressed it." His deep affection for flowers and all of nature was concurrent with the writings of Emerson, Thoreau and other skilled observers of all things big and small. It would benefit us greatly if we but followed in his footsteps as persons, striving to be positive contributors to the world around us.

In coming reviews, I promise to relate to the aspects of beekeeping that the book details and can still provide for many wonderful insights.


Bee Involved: Highways BEE Act

by Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

This legislation is something that we all need to get our congressmen acting on, as it is vitally important to the survival of our bees. It has been supported by the NAPPC, which is working hard on behalf of all pollinator species to improve their chances for survival. With all of the loss of habitat that is going on across the country today with the planting of corn, soybeans, wheat and milo from road to road in many areas, we have lost much of the diversity of plant species that are necessary to maintain optimum honey bee health. This proposed bill will reduce costs for the states and help our honey bees and all native pollinators. You can sign on in support of the bill at http://pollinator.org/BEEAct.htm. It was introduced as H.R. 2381 with representatives Hastings (D-FL) and Johnson (R-IL), joined by Blumenauer (D-OR) and Boswell (D-IA) as original cosponsors.
 
Our American roadsides are often quite wide in areas supporting a good amount of acreage for native species of plants and pollinators to survive and even thrive in if conditions and maintenance are optimum. The Highways BEE Act (Highways Bettering the Economy and Environment Act) proposes significant economic and conservation benefits that can be achieved through integrated vegetation management (IVM) practices on federal and state highway right-of-ways(ROWs) managed by state departments of transportation (DOTs). These areas represent about 17 million acres of opportunity where significant reductions in mowing and maintenance can reduce costs for cash-strapped state DOTs.

Reductions in roadside mowing, combined with enhanced plantings of native forbs and grasses, can provide economic benefits, reduced carbon emissions, and critical habitat for pollinators, ground nesting birds and other small wildlife. Pollinators, such as bees, birds, bats and butterflies, are essential to healthy ecosystems and are vital partners in American agriculture. Pollinators are suffering drastic population loss, due in part to loss of habitat. In addition, neighboring agricultural lands and wildlife ecosystems will benefit from improved pollination services.

This legislation supports and builds on innovative IVM efforts in a growing number of state DOT's by directing the Secretary of Transportation to use existing authorities, programs and funding to encourage and facilitate efforts by states and other transportation ROWs managers, to adopt IVM practices, including reduced mowing and enhanced native plantings that provide multiple fiscal, safety and aesthetic benefits while also promoting habitat and migratory corridors for pollinators, ground nesting birds and other small wildlife.

So, take a few moments out of your hectic schedule and sign on in support of this bill. And, it doesn't hurt to keep in contact with the representatives and senators in your state in regard to their support of the bill as well. To locate and e-mail your representatives and senators, visit www.congress.gov. All pollinators need this bill to pass.


Moments in Beekeeping: ABF Announces Photo Contest Winners!

by Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

Janet Rowe's grand-prize-winning photo in the
"Kids and Bees" category

Thanks to Erika Decker, Jackie Fiedler, Kelly Chouinaro, Michael Korff, Wayne McChesney, Debra Ross, Cindy Hodges, Tami Kuehl, Juliette Sterner, Kassandra Groenhof, Mark Jusko, Janet Rowe and James Fink for sending in entries for the contest. There were some great entries and I hope that you all send in more of your photos for the next contest, as well.

The winner of each category will be awarded the following items courtesy of EKOBeekeeping.com (total value of $55): One 50ml bottle of Nozevit Plus; One 100ml bottle of OPIMA (essential oil, plant polyphenols, vitamins, minerals and amino acids food supplement); and One European Beekeepers Veil. The grand-prize winner, Janet Rowe, will receive a Master Beekeepers Suit from Brushy Mountain Bee Farm.

We hope to build on the prizes and make it even more worth your while should you win one of the first-place awards. The winners are as follows for each category (click on the link below the name to view the winning photograph).

Thanks to Dr. Joe Carson (EKOBeekeeping.com) and Brushy Mountain Bee Farm for providing prizes for this contest. We really appreciate your contributions in making it a successful and worthwhile venture.

Also, a BIG THANKS to our contest judge, Zachary Huang, for his time involved in viewing all of the entries and determining our winners. It is wonderful when people step up to volunteer their efforts and expertise in support of our beekeeping industry.


Buzzmakers: Latest and Greatest Beekeeping Industry News

  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released a notice inviting farmers to apply for Value-Added Producer Grants (VAPG). The notice combines two years' worth of funding for the program, making $37 million available for new value-added projects. Project proposals are due by August 29. The complete application package is available from the USDA Rural Development site at http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_VAPG_Grants.html.
  • The key to the decline of native pollinators is the loss of habitat. And, the key to their recovery will be finding an economically viable way to create habitats that bring these helpful pollinators back to the farm. Discover additional details at http://www.dailydemocrat.com/business/ci_18299716.
  • When some see a colony of bees they want to run away as far as they can, but not so for bee lovers who gathered at the St. Louis Zoo in late June. A special dinner and honey tasting allowed bee lovers to learn as much as they could. See more at http://www.fox2now.com/news/ktvi-st-louis-zoo-bee-dinner-062311,0,1309629.story.
  • A new video describing the importance of native pollinators in Pennsylvania has recently been posted on YouTube. Produced by Penn State's Dr. Ed Rajotte and Dr. David Biddinger, "Native Pollinators: A Promising Solution to an Emerging Crisis," describes the decline of honey bees and the role other native pollinators play in pollination of crops. Check out the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYKVI8ayzsw.
  • The Government of Canada is helping the beekeeping industry develop new strategies to respond to a decline in honey bee colony populations. Member of Parliament Patricia Davidson (Sarnia-Lambton) recently announced on behalf of Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz an investment of more than $244,000 to the Ontario Beekeepers' Association. Read more at http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/-1532650.htm.

ABF Welcomes New Members — May 2011

  • Konrad Bouffard, Texas
  • Kurt Brandi, California
  • Alan Haarsma, Michigan
  • Mark Hedley, Texas
  • Kimberly Kilbansky, Massachusetts
  • Christina Miraglia, Massachusetts
  • Jared Rybolt, Indiana
  • Keith Sharples, Indiana
  • Margaret Trocki, Illinois
  • Kurt Von Tungeln, Oklahoma
  • Alicia Williamson, Georgia
  • Alexander Reeder, Oregon

Recipe of the Month: Honey Apple Crisp

Recipe from Tim Tucker, ABF Membership and Marketing Committee Member and ABF E-Buzz Editor

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 4-6 large tart apples, sliced (approx. 3 lbs.)
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/2 t. ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 t. ground nutmeg
  • 1 t. lemon juice
  • 4-6 thin slices of butter or margarine
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (if desired)

Directions:

  • In a 7 X 7 baking dish, arrange half the sliced apples.
  • In a small pan, warm the honey and add the lemon juice, cinnamon and nutmeg.
  • Pour the honey mixture over apples. Spread walnuts over apples and honey mixture if desired.
  • Cut in a half a dozen thin slices of margarine or butter into apples spreading evenly.
  • With a pastry blender or knife, blend together flour, sugar and butter. Work lightly to just mix ingredients. Spread evenly over apples and bake in a moderate oven of 375 degrees for about 30 minutes.
  • Cool and serve with a generous helping of honey ice cream.

 

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